Policies & Resources

EDI: Policies and Resources

 

This information is to help you with understanding the dynamics of sexual violence, as well as to provide you with both inter-campus and community resources. For additional information, please contact our college staff. You can find a listing and contact information in our Need Help section.

You should know that the State University of New York and SUNY Erie are committed to providing options, support and assistance to victims/survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and/or stalking to ensure that they can continue to participate in campus programs and activities. All victims/survivors of these crimes and violations, regardless of race, color, national origin, religion, creed, age, disability, sex, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, familial status, pregnancy, predisposing genetic characteristics, military status, domestic violence victim status, or criminal conviction, have the following rights, regardless of whether the crime or violation occurs on campus, off campus, or while studying abroad.

YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO:
  • Make a report to local law enforcement and/or state police.
    Have disclosures of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and sexual assault treated seriously.
  • Make a decision about whether or not to disclose a crime or violation and participate in the judicial or conduct process and/or criminal justice process free from pressure by the institution.
  • Participate in a process that is fair, impartial, and provides adequate notice and meaningful opportunity to be heard.
  • Be treated with dignity and to receive from the institution courteous, fair, and respectful health care and counseling services, where available.
  • Be free from suggestion that the reporting individual is at fault when these crimes and violations are committed, or should have acted in a different manner to avoid such crimes or violations.
  • Describe the incident to as few institution representatives as practicable and not be required to unnecessarily repeat a description of the incident.
  • Be protected from retaliation by the institution, any student, the accused and/or the respondent, and/or their friends, family, and acquaintances within the jurisdiction of the institution.
  • Access to at least one level of appeal in a determination.
  • Be accompanied by an advisor of their choice who may assist and advise a reporting individual, accused, or respondent throughout the judicial or conduct process including during all meetings and hearings related to such process.
  • Exercise civil rights and practice religion without interference by the investigative, criminal justice, or judicial or conduct process of the institution.
Resources

Crisis Services: Sexual Violence

Crisis Services Advocate
Phone: 716-536-4147, Hotline: (716) 834-3131

Erie County Coalition Against Family Violence

Human Rights Campaign: provides LGBTQ with friendly hotlines that can direct survivors to local services

PRIDE Center of Western New York

National Domestic Violence Hotline: Resources with links to helpful information for those offering support to survivors

RAINN: Specific information about dating violence, stalking, survivors w/disabilities, resources for male and LGBTQ survivors, legal resources, medical, physical and mental health, suicide and self harm and sexual assault prevention


SUNY Erie’s efforts to foster an environment of acceptance and inclusivity at the College have expanded to include gender inclusive restrooms.

What is a gender inclusive restroom?
Simply, a restroom that is open to all genders rather than gender-specific (e.g. Men or Women).

Why gender inclusive restrooms?
Many transgender and gender nonconforming people face deep discomfort, discrimination, harassment, or even violence simply for using the restroom. Most restrooms are exclusive to "Men" and "Women" leaving members of our community without a safe space to use the restroom. Providing gender inclusive restrooms that are available to anyone regardless of gender identity or expression allows everyone to use the restroom in safety and peace. Parents or caregivers of a different gender also benefit from gender inclusive restrooms.

How can I find a gender inclusive restroom?
There are gender inclusive restrooms in every building on our campuses. The College has recently installed "Inclusive Restroom" signage on our campuses to notate which restrooms are gender inclusive.


Options for Confidentiality Disclosing Sexual Violence *PDFs
Sexual Violence Response Policy
Victims' Rights Statement


Definition of Affirmative Consent
Video Resource:  Affirmative Consent
Policy for Alcohol and/or Drug Use Amnesty
Video Resource:  Amnesty
Bill of Rights - Part I
Bill of Rights - Part II
College and Criminal Resource
Executive Summary Concerning Campus Climate Survey
First Response ASL Translation
Immigration and Visa Information In Response To Sexual & Interpersonal Violence
Sexual Assault & Violence Response (SAVR) Resources


Toolkits

 

General Information and Terminology

Common identifiable terms include: Asian, East Asian, Southeast Asian, or South Asian
Approximately 2.17% of undergraduate students at SUNY Erie are Asian.

Historically Significant Dates

• 1849 (California Gold Rush attracts Chinese immigrants)
• 1882 (Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association formed)
• 1885 (select Japanese laborers allowed into Hawaii)
• May 10, 1886 (Yick Wo v. Hopkins Decision)
• March 28, 1898 (United States v. Wong Kim Ark Decision)
• December 17, 1943 (Magnuson Act)
• April 1, 1980 (Refugee Act of 1980)
• October 22, 1982 (American Homecoming Act)

Holidays and observances

• Chinese New Year: second new Moon after the Winter Solstice (China)
• Holi: last full moon of lunar month Phalguna (South Asia)
• Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month: May

Leaders/Influencers

• Mahatma Gandhi
• Yoko Ono
• Tammy Duckworth
• Michelle Kwan
• Yo-Yo Ma
• Steven Chu
• Michio Kaku

Common Dos and Don’ts when Discussing Culture with Asian Persons

Dos
• Do treat all people with respect, dignity, and courtesy
• Do actively try to listen more than you speak
• Do put in time to learn about an Asian person’s country of origin
• Do make a conscious effort to educate an Asian immigrant on something they do not understand
• Do recognize the struggles of other people, regardless of your comfort level with the situation
• Do provide a supportive channel for them to be demonstrative of their thoughts
• Do put effort into breaking down the specifics of a controversial situation
• Do recognize everyone's uniqueness

Don'ts
• Don’t make the focus of the conversation about yourself
• Don’t interrupt people while they are speaking
• Don’t assume that you having not encountered a situation is evidence of its nonexistence
• Don’t generalize all Asians under one Asian country
• Don’t try to force your personal preference for working/interacting on another person
• Don’t give off the message that the person you are speaking with is exaggerating their experience with inequality
• Don’t imply that you have the same exact feeling as them in regards to racism
• Don’t make assumptions about a person solely due to the presence of a language barrier
• Don’t put emphasis on racial stereotypes throughout your conversation
• Don’t assert ideas outside of your level of experience
• Don’t treat cultural competency about Asian people as a fad

Resources for Students

Healthcare: SUNY Erie Health Services

Resources for Faculty and Staff

Center for Professional Development (CPD)

Area Resources

Buffalo Area Community Groups and Activities
•  Asian/Pacific Islander/American Association of Greater Rochester
•  Saathi
•  India Community Center (33.4 miles)
 Chinese School of Rochester (25.1 miles)

Buffalo Area Cultural Restaurants
Buffalo Area Grocery Stores
Buffalo Area Churches

National Support and Resources

• National Association of Asian American Professionals (NAAAP)
• Women in NAAAP (WIN!)
• Asian American Business Development Center
• Asian American Government Executives Network
• Ascend
• Asian Women in Business
• Asian Pacific American Chamber of Commerce (APACC)
• Asian Pacific American Medical Student Association (APAMSA)
• The Center for Asian Pacific American Women
• Committee of 100
• Federal Asian Pacific American Council (FAPAC)
• Japanese American Citizens League (JACL)
• Korean American Coalition (KAC)
• National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum
• National Coalition for Asian Pacific American Community Development (National CAPACD)
• U.S. Pan Asian American Chamber of Commerce (USPAACC)
• South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT)
• Asian American Racial Justice Toolkit

General Information and Terminology

Common identifiable terms include: Black, African American, Bicultural, Mixed, or Biracial
• The term Black is used to refer to all people and cultures of African descent
• The term African American is used to refer to a Black person who is a descendent of African slaves brought to the United States
• Approximately 11.3% of undergraduate students here are Black or African American

Historically Significant Dates

• January 1, 1863 (Emancipation Proclamation)
• February 12, 1909 (NAACP Founded)
• May 17, 1954 (Brown v. Board of Education Decision)
• 1961 (Freedom Riders)
• December 1, 1955 (Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott)
• August 6, 1965 (Voting Rights Act of 1965)
• August 28, 1963 (March on Washington & "I Have a Dream" Speech by Martin Luther King Jr.)

Holidays and observances

• Martin Luther King Jr. Day: third Monday of January
• Black History Month: February
• Juneteenth: June 19
• Nelson Mandela International Day: July 18
• Marcus Garvey Day: August 17
• Kwanzaa: December 26 – January 1

Leaders/Influencers

• Maya Angelou
• James Baldwin
• W.E.B. Du Bois
• Katherine Johnson
• Martin Luther King Jr.
• Rosa Parks
• Malcolm X
• Booker T. Washington
• Ida B. Wells
• Nelson Mandela
• Desmond Tutu
• Marcus Garvey
• Arthur Ashe
• Harry Belafonte
• Walter Rodney
• John Lewis
• Condoleezza Rice
• Oprah Winfrey
• Barack Obama
• Angela Davis

Common Dos and Don'ts When Discussing Culture with Black & African American Persons

Dos
• Do treat all people with respect, dignity, and courtesy
• Do actively try to listen more than you speak
• Do ask people how they would like to be referred to
• Do acknowledge different levels of privilege that are present in people
• Do make a conscious effort to educate a Black immigrant on something they do not understand
• Do recognize the struggles of other people, regardless of your comfort level with the situation
• Do provide a supportive channel for them to be demonstrative of their thoughts
• Do be aware of descriptive words with negative connotations (e.g. loud, animated, distracting, etc.)
• Do put effort into breaking down the specifics of a controversial situation
• Do recognize everyone's uniqueness

Don'ts
• Don't make the focus of the conversation about yourself
• Don't use cultural lingo that is appropriate in specific isolated environments
• Don't misinterpret passion for threat
• Don't assume that all Black & African American people have a certain pigmentation
• Don’t try to force your personal preference for working/interacting on another person
• Don't assume that pigmentation allows you to identify a specific person's culture
• Don't give off the message that the person you are speaking with is exaggerating their experience with inequality
• Don't assume that you having not encountered a situation is evidence of its nonexistence
• Don't imply that you have the same exact feeling as them in regards to racism
• Don't put emphasis on racial stereotypes throughout your conversation
• Don't assert ideas outside of your level of experience
• Don't treat cultural competency about Black & African American persons as a fad

Resources for Students

Healthcare: SUNY Erie Health Services

Area Resources

Buffalo Area Community Groups and Activities
• Buffalo Black Young Professionals
• Black-Owned Business Buffalo
• Urban League of Buffalo
• United Way of Greater Buffalo

Buffalo Area Cultural Restaurants
Buffalo Area Churches

National Support and Resources

• Black Lives Matter (BLM)
• Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)
• National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)
• National Medical Association (NMA)
• National Urban League
• African American Planning Commission (AAPC)
• The Executive Leadership Council
• National Black Chamber of Commerce (NBCC)
• National Black Justice Commission
• National Council of Negro Women, Inc. (NCNW)
• National Coalition of 100 Black Women (NCBW)
• 100 Black Men of America
• United Negro College Fund (UNCF)
• U.S. Black Chambers, Inc.

Literary Works

• The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
• On the Come Up by Angie Thomas
• Love Like Sky by Leslie Youngblood
• Dining and Dancing with the Devils by Dr. John K Marah

On-Campus Resources

Equity and Diversity Office    
Tracy A. Archie
archie@ecc.edu

Tracey Cleveland
clevelandt@ecc.edu

Dean of Students:
Petrina Cheathom-Hill
cheatom@ecc.edu

Jason Perri
perri@ecc.edu

Amy Yoder
yoder@ecc.edu

Men of Merit    
Dr. Marvin Wilson
wilsonma@ecc.edu

SUNY Erie Student Government


General Information and Terminology

 Common identifiable terms include: Hispanic, Latino, Latina, or Latinx.
• The term Hispanic is used to refer to a Spanish-speaking person.
• The term Latino is used to refer to a male of Latin American descent residing in the United States.
• The term Latina is used to refer to a female of Latin American descent residing in the United States.
• The term Latinx is used to refer to refer all Latinos regardless of gender identity.
• Approximately 7.35% of undergraduate students at SUNY Erie are Hispanic.

Historically Significant Dates

• March 2, 1917 (U.S. Citizenship extended to Puerto Ricans)
• October 13, 1921 (Order of the Sons of America)
• February 17, 1929 (League of United Latin American Citizens Founded)
• August 4, 1942 (Bracero Program Founded)
• May 3, 1954 (Hernandez v. Texas Decision)
• 1961 (ASPIRA Founded)
• January 1, 1994 (NAFTA reduced trade barriers with Mexico)

Holidays and Observances

• Día de Los Tres Reyes Magos (Three Kings’ Day): January 6th
• Dominican Republic Independence Day: February 27th
• Semana Santa (Holy Week): Week before Easter
• Pascua (Easter): First Sunday after the Full Moon on or after the March equinox
• Cinco de Mayo: May 5th (Mexico)
• Paraguay Independence Day: May 14th
• Cuba Independence Day: May 20th
• Venezuela Independence Day: July 5th
• Argentina Independence Day: July 9th
• Colombia Independence Day: July 20th
• Peru Independence Day: July 28th
• Bolivia Independence Day: August 6th
• Ecuador Independence Day: August 10th
• Uruguay Independence Day: August 25th
• Brazil Independence Day: September 7th
• Costa Rica Independence Day: September 15th
• El Salvador Independence Day: September 15th
• Guatemala Independence Day: September 15th
• Honduras Independence Day: September 15th
• Nicaragua Independence Day: September 15th
• Hispanic Heritage Month: September 15th – October 15th
• Mexico Independence Day: September 16th
• Chile Independence Day: September 18th
• Belize Independence Day: September 21st
• Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead): November 1st (Mexico)
• Panama Independence Day: November 3rd
• Las Posadas: December 16th – December 24th
• Nochebuena (Christmas Eve): December 24th
• Navidad (Christmas): December 25th

Leaders/Influencers

 Cesar Chavez
 Carlos Santana
 Sonia Sotomayor
 Luis Muñoz Marín
 Pablo Picasso
 Salvador Dalí
 Helen Rodríguez Trías

Common Dos and Don'ts When Discussing Culture with Hispanic & Latinx Persons

Dos
• Do treat all people with respect, dignity, and courtesy
• Do actively try to listen more than you speak
• Do ask people how they would like to be referred to
• Do put in time to learn about a Hispanic & Latinx person's country of origin
• Do make a conscious effort to educate a Hispanic & Latinx immigrant on something they do not understand
• Do recognize the struggles of other people, regardless of your comfort level with the situation
• Do provide a supportive channel for them to be demonstrative of their thoughts
• Do put effort into breaking down the specifics of a controversial situation
• Do recognize everyone's uniqueness

Don'ts
• Don’t make the focus of the conversation about yourself
• Don’t use cultural lingo that is appropriate in specific isolated environments
• Don’t assume that you having not encountered a situation is evidence of its nonexistence
• Don't generalize all Hispanic & Latinx persons under one Spanish speaking country
• Don't try to force your personal preference for working/interacting on another person
• Don’t give off the message that the person you are speaking with is exaggerating their experience with inequality
• Don’t imply that you have the same exact feeling as them in regards to racism
• Don't make assumptions about a person solely due to the presence of a language barrier
• Don't put emphasis on racial stereotypes throughout your conversation
• Don't assert ideas outside of your level of experience
• Don't treat cultural competency about Hispanic & Latinx persons as a fad

Resources for Students

Healthcare: SUNY Erie Health Services

Resources for Faculty and Staff

Center for Professional Development (CPD)

Area Resources

Buffalo Area Community Groups and Activities
Buffalo Area Cultural Restaurants
Buffalo Area Churches

National Support and Resources

 Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities 
 The Hispanic Outlook in Higher Education
 The Committee for Hispanic Families and Children (CHFC)
 Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (CHCI)
 Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility (HACR)
 Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund
 National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials (NALEO)
 Unidos US
 National Hispanic Corporate Council (NHCC)
 National Hispanic Institute (NHI)
 National Hispanic Medical Association (NHMA)
• The National Institute for Latino Policy
 United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC)
 ASPIRA
 League of United Latin American CitizeAC)

General Information and Terminology

SUNY Erie affirms a campus population with a diverse range of citizenship statuses, including, but not limited to, some of the following:
• alien
• dependent
• DREAMer
• foreign student
• illegal alien
• immigrant
• immediate relative
• international student
• legalized alien
• lottery admission
• migrant
• naturalized citizen
• nonimmigrant
• permanent resident
• refugee
• resident alien
• temporary worker

Resources and Information

• Glossary of Immigration Terms
• U.S. Department of Education Resources
• U.S. Department of Justice DACA Rights
• Dream Act timeline and terms
• DACA Resource Page: For International Student Advisers
• DACA FAQ

 DACA Response to January 2018 Preliminary Injunction

Historically Significant Dates

• August 1, 2001 (Development, Relief, and Education of Alien Minors (DREAM) Act proposed to U.S. Senate)
• June 15, 2012 (President Obama creates Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA))
• August 15, 2012 (U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services begins accepting DACA applications)
• September 5, 2017 (Trump administration rescinds DACA)
• January 9, 2018 (Federal court issues injunction keeping DACA policy in place until further notice)

Resources for Students

Healthcare: SUNY Erie Health Services
International Student Orientation

Area Resources

Buffalo Area Community Groups and Activities

New York Area USCIS Offices
• Albany
• Buffalo
• Long Island
• New York City

National Support and Resources

• Global Youth Connect
• AIESEC
• International Exchange Student Network (IESN)
• International Student Organization
• Students for Liberty
• NAFSA
• U.S. Department of State
• U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
• U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
• U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)
• Presidential Actions

General Information and Terminology

Common identifiable terms include:
• Lesbian
• Gay
• Bisexual
• Queer
• Questioning
• Pansexual
• Asexual
• Straight
• Transgender
• Transsexual
• Genderqueer
• Gender variant
• Gender non-conforming
• Intersex
• Intergender
• Gender Fluid
• Bigender
• Cisgender

Historically Significant Dates

• 1924 (Society for Human Rights formed)
• 1950 (Mattachine Society formed)
• September 1955 (Daughters of Bilitis formed)
• 1973 (Lambda Legal established)
• October 14, 1979 (March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights)
• 1983 (People v. West 12 Tenants Corp. Decision)
• June 26, 2003 (Lawrence v. Texas Decision)
• October 28, 2009 (Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act)
• September 20, 2011 ("Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell" Repealed)
• June 26, 2013 (United States v. Windsor Decision)

Holidays and observances

• Day of Silence: Second Friday of April
• International Day against Homophobia, Transphobia & Biphobia: May 17
• LGBT Pride Month: June
• LGBT Pride Day: Last Sunday in June
• National Coming Out Day: October 11

General Information and Terminology

Common identifiable terms include: Native American, American Indian, or First Nations Peoples

Approximately 0.18% of undergraduate students here are Native American.

Historically Significant Dates

• August 7, 1790 (Treaty of New York)
• July 28, 1827 (Cherokee Constitution created)
• October 6, 1879 (Carlisle Indian School recruits first students)
• January 1, 1889 (Ghost Dance by Wovoka)
• October 1911 (Society of American Indians formed)
• June 2, 1924 (Indian Citizenship Act)
• November 1944 (National Congress of American Indians formed)
• August 11, 1978 (American Indian Religious Freedom Act)

 

Holidays and Observances

• Native American Citizenship Day: June 15th
• Indigenous Peoples’ Day: Second Monday in October
• Native American Heritage Month: November

Leaders/Influencers

• Sacagawea
• Pontiac
• Pocahontas
• Squanto
• Geronimo
• Tecumseh

Common Dos and Don’ts when Discussing Culture with Native American Persons

Dos
• Do treat all people with respect, dignity, and courtesy
• Do actively try to listen more than you speak
• Do put in time to learn about a Native American person’s tribal history
• Do recognize the struggles of other people, regardless of your comfort level with the situation
• Do provide a supportive channel for them to be demonstrative of their thoughts
• Do put effort into breaking down the specifics of a controversial situation
• Do recognize everyone's uniqueness

Don'ts
• Don’t make the focus of the conversation about yourself
• Don’t interrupt people while they are speaking
• Don’t assume that you having not encountered a situation is evidence of its nonexistence
• Don’t generalize all Native Americans under one tribe
• Don’t try to force your personal preference for working/interacting on another person
• Don’t give off the message that the person you are speaking with is exaggerating their experience with inequality
• Don’t imply that you have the same exact feeling as them in regards to racism
• Don’t put emphasis on racial stereotypes throughout your conversation
• Don’t assert ideas outside of your level of experience
• Don’t treat cultural competency about Native American people as a fad

Resources for Students

Healthcare: SUNY Erie Health Services

Resources for Faculty and Staff

• Center for Professional Development (CPD)

Area Resources

Buffalo/Rochester Area Community Groups and Activities
• Native American Cultural Center (26.7 miles)
• Seneca Art & Culture Center at Ganondagan (39.7 miles)

New York Area Indian Reservations
• Allegany Reservation (97.5 miles)
• St. Regis Mohawk Reservation (280 miles)
• Cattaraugus Reservation (97.7 miles)
• Tuscarora Nation Reservation (56.8 miles)
• Tonawanda Reservation (34.4 miles)
• Onondaga Nation Reservation (120 miles)
• Oneida Nation Reservation (138 miles)
• Oil Springs Reservation (77.8 miles)

National Support and Resources

• American Indian Business Leaders (AIBL)
• American Indian College Fund
• American Indian Higher Education Consortium
• A.I.R Policy Center
• Association of American Indian Affairs (AAIA)
• Indian Country Media Network
• National Alaska Native American Indian Nurses Association (NANAINA)
• Redhawk Native American Arts Council
• Native American Capital (NAC)
• Native American Disability Law Center
• Native American Financial Official Association (NAFOA)
• Native American Journalists Association
• Native American Rights Fund
• Native American Bar Association
• National Native American Law Enforcement Association (NNALEA)
• Women Empowering Women for Indian Nations (WEWIN)
• Bureau of Indian Education
• American Indian/Native American Scholarships
• Tribal Enrollment Process
• U.S. Department of the Interior Indian Affairs
• National Congress of American Indians
• American Indian Science and Engineering Society
• Indians Into Medicine
• Indian Country
• Native American Online
• United Indians of All Tribes Foundation